Coverart for item
The Resource Empire of the summer moon : [a Gab bag for book discussion groups], S.C. Gwynne, (kit)

Empire of the summer moon : [a Gab bag for book discussion groups], S.C. Gwynne, (kit)

Label
Empire of the summer moon : [a Gab bag for book discussion groups]
Title
Empire of the summer moon
Title remainder
[a Gab bag for book discussion groups]
Statement of responsibility
S.C. Gwynne
Title variation
Gab bags
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A history of the 40-year battle between the Comanche Indians and white settlers, centering on the Comanche chief Quanah
Member of
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Award
  • Oklahoma Book Award for Nonfiction, 2011.
  • New York Times Notable Book, 2010
Review
  • Journalist Gwynne tracks one of the U.S.'s longest-running military conflicts in this gripping history of the war against the Comanche Indians on the high plains of Texas and Colorado. The Comanches stood for decades as the single most effective military force on the southern plains; their mastery of horseback warfare and their intimate knowledge of the trackless desert of the plains stymied the armies of Spain and Mexico, and blocked American westward expansion for 40 years. Gwynne's account orbits around Quanah Parker (ca. 1852–1911), the brilliant war chief whose resistance raged even as the Comanche, increasingly demoralized by the loss of the buffalo and the American military's policy of total annihilation, retreated into the reservation. Rigorously researched and evenhanded, the book paints both the Comanches and Americans in their glory and shame, bravery and savagery. The author's narrative prowess is marred only by his fondness for outdated anthropological terminology (“low barbarian,” “premoral” culture). That aside, the book combines rich historical detail with a keen sense of adventure and of the humanity of its protagonists. (May) --Staff (Reviewed February 1, 2010) (Publishers Weekly, vol 257, issue 5, p41)
  • This is a highly readable, but problematic, account of Cynthia Ann Parker, captured by the Comanche Indians at age nine, and her son Quanah Parker, who grew up to become the most famous of all Comanche chiefs. Gwynne (The Outlaw Bank: A Wild Ride into the Secret Heart of the BCCI ) proves adept at using primary sources to illuminate the military history of the Comanche empire and the Texas frontier. He gives good attention to John Coffee Hays and the Texas Rangers, and to Gen. Ranald Slidell Mackenzie, whom Gwynne describes as the "Anti-Custer." Yet this work is marred by a surprising insensitivity, with frequent references to Indian women as "squaws," and sparse information on Comanche individuals without any white heritage. VERDICT Readers wanting more biographical information on the Parkers should turn to Jo Ella Powell Exley's Frontier Blood: The Saga of the Parker Family , while those wishing more of a Comanche view should see Pekka Hämäläinen's The Comanche Empire . Despite its title, this work is at its best as a Texas-centric militaristic interpretation of the 19th-century Comanche wars of the southern Plains.—Nathan E. Bender, Laramie, WY --Nathan E. Bender (Reviewed February 15, 2010) (Library Journal, vol 135, issue 3, p104)
  • An appropriately fast-paced life of Comanche leader Quanah Parker and his band, the last Native free riders on the plains.Former Time editor and correspondent Gwynne (The Outlaw Bank: A Wild Ride into the Secret Heart of BCCI, 1993, etc.) approaches Parker's life as news, opening with an intriguing gambit—namely, that Parker, who died in 1911, had an Anglo mother who, as he said, "love Indian and wild life so well, no want to go back to white folks." Where his mixed blood might have been a demerit in other Indian groups—and certainly in white society of the time—Parker rose quickly to the leadership of the Quahadi band of Comanches as a young man of perhaps only 20. As Gwynne notes, the Comanches kept the Spanish empire from spreading onto the plains beyond Texas, making even the Apaches farther west seem a mild threat by comparison. The Quahadi band, whom he characterizes as "magnificently aloof," were the toughest of the lot. When Americans entered the picture in the 1830s and beyond, the Quahadis fought them so hard that by the 1870s whole counties formerly settled by Texas ranchers and farmers were depopulated. Parker's tough leadership eventually proved no match for the combined weight of Texas Rangers, the U.S. Army and other heavily armed enemies, who finally broke the Quahadi resistance after removing other Comanche bands to reservations and reducing their number to no more than 2,000. After surrender, Parker continued to insist on preserving Comanche ways, particularly an illegal peyote cult. Gwynne considers Parker alongside Geronimo, the better-known Apache leader, and finds the latter wanting in the comparison. Parker remained a leader of his people to the end, writes the author, one who "looked resolutely forward toward something better" rather than surrendering to embitterment or allowing himself to be put on display as a wild Indian now tamed. "I no monkey," he insisted.A welcome contribution to the history of Texas, Westward expansion and Native America. (Kirkus Reviews, February 15, 2010)
Biography type
individual biography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
348037
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1953-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Gwynne, S. C.
Dewey number
  • 978.004/974572
  • B
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • plates
Index
index present
LC call number
E99.C85
LC item number
P3835 2010
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Williamsburg Regional Library
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Parker, Quanah
  • Comanche Indians
  • Comanche Indians
  • Comanche Indians
  • Frontier and pioneer life
  • West (U.S.)
  • West (U.S.)
  • West (U.S.)
  • West (U.S.)
  • Book clubs (Discussion groups)
  • Group reading
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Quanah Parker and the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history
Label
Empire of the summer moon : [a Gab bag for book discussion groups], S.C. Gwynne, (kit)
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Title from tag attached to tote bag
  • Assembled by the Adult Services staff of the Williamsburg Regional Library for use by book discussion groups
  • Copies published: Scribner, 2010 (imprint may vary)
  • Each copy: viii, 371 pages
Accompanying material
1 resource notebook
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 343-355) and index
Carrier category
object
Carrier category code
  • nr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
three-dimensional form
Content type code
  • tdf
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
A new kind of war -- A lethal paradise -- Worlds in collision -- High lonesome -- The wolf's howl -- Blood and smoke -- Dream visions and Apocalypse -- White squaw -- Chasing the wind -- Death's innocent face -- War to the knife -- White queen of the Comanches -- The rise of Quanah -- Uncivil wars -- Peace, and other horrors -- The anti-Custer -- Mackenzie unbound -- The hide men and the messiah -- The Red River War -- Forward, in defeat -- This was a man -- Resting here until day breaks
Edition
Book discussion group edition.
Extent
11 regular print copies +
Isbn
9781416591054
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2009049747
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Note
Please call the Adult Services Desk at 259-7720 with any questions.
System control number
  • 424555364
  • (OCoLC)424555364
Label
Empire of the summer moon : [a Gab bag for book discussion groups], S.C. Gwynne, (kit)
Link
Publication
Note
  • Title from tag attached to tote bag
  • Assembled by the Adult Services staff of the Williamsburg Regional Library for use by book discussion groups
  • Copies published: Scribner, 2010 (imprint may vary)
  • Each copy: viii, 371 pages
Accompanying material
1 resource notebook
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 343-355) and index
Carrier category
object
Carrier category code
  • nr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
three-dimensional form
Content type code
  • tdf
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
A new kind of war -- A lethal paradise -- Worlds in collision -- High lonesome -- The wolf's howl -- Blood and smoke -- Dream visions and Apocalypse -- White squaw -- Chasing the wind -- Death's innocent face -- War to the knife -- White queen of the Comanches -- The rise of Quanah -- Uncivil wars -- Peace, and other horrors -- The anti-Custer -- Mackenzie unbound -- The hide men and the messiah -- The Red River War -- Forward, in defeat -- This was a man -- Resting here until day breaks
Edition
Book discussion group edition.
Extent
11 regular print copies +
Isbn
9781416591054
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2009049747
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Note
Please call the Adult Services Desk at 259-7720 with any questions.
System control number
  • 424555364
  • (OCoLC)424555364

Library Locations

  • James City County LibraryBorrow it
    7770 Croaker Road, Williamsburg, VA, 23188, US
    37.377573 -76.770995
  • WRL Mobile Library ServicesBorrow it
    7770 Croaker Road, Williamsburg, VA, 23188, US
    37.377573 -76.770995
  • Williamsburg LibraryBorrow it
    515 Scotland Street, Williamsburg, VA, 23185, US
    37.377573 -76.770995
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