Coverart for item
The Resource God's red son : the Ghost Dance religion and the making of modern America, Louis S. Warren

God's red son : the Ghost Dance religion and the making of modern America, Louis S. Warren

Label
God's red son : the Ghost Dance religion and the making of modern America
Title
God's red son
Title remainder
the Ghost Dance religion and the making of modern America
Statement of responsibility
Louis S. Warren
Title variation
Ghost Dance religion and the making of modern America
Title variation remainder
:the ghost dance religion and the making of modern America
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"In 1890, on Indian reservations across the West, followers of a new religion danced in circles until they collapsed into trances. In an attempt to suppress this new faith, the US Army killed over two hundred Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek. Louis Warren's God's Red Son offers a startling new view of the religion known as the Ghost Dance, from its origins in the visions of a Northern Paiute named Wovoka to the tragedy in South Dakota. To this day, the Ghost Dance remains widely mischaracterized as a primitive and failed effort by Indian militants to resist American conquest and return to traditional ways. In fact, followers of the Ghost Dance sought to thrive in modern America by working for wages, farming the land, and educating their children, tenets that helped the religion endure for decades after Wounded Knee. God's Red Son powerfully reveals how Ghost Dance teachings helped Indians retain their identity and reshape the modern world." -- Publisher's description
Writing style
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Warren, a professor of U.S. history at the University of California, Davis, provides an engrossing, readable, and carefully researched history plotting the rise, spread, and continued life of the Ghost Dance among Native Americans. Since its rise in 1890 and sudden, violent suppression at Wounded Knee, the history of the Ghost Dance has focused on its return to past practices, the promise of a land free from whites, and protection in battle. Warren does not dismiss the influence of forced resettlement and broken treaties made with Native American communities, but he persuasively argues that Native American adherents focused more on integrating with Euro-American economy and used the Ghost Dance to maintain their native culture and “Indianness.” Key figures shape his narrative, including the prophet Wokova in Nevada, whose visions sparked the movement; Short Bull, the Lakota who brought it to the Plains; and James Mooney, the white anthropologist who recorded it and shaped all subsequent scholarship. Warren ties together seemingly unrelated strands to give a clear sense of the convulsing changes and challenges of the last decade of the 19th century. The work will delight fans of well-written history and appeal to historians of the West, Native Americans, and religion. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed 02/13/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 07, p)
  • In 1889, Northern Paiute leader Wovoka experienced a vision which led him to preach that Native tribes should peacefully coexist with settlers. He also promised that performing the Ghost Dance would see him to a utopian existence where Native Americans flourished. Wovoka's promise appealed to peoples like the Arapaho and Sioux who suffered from abject poverty and hopelessness on reservations. Although the Ghost Dance was a peaceful movement, the federal government suppressed the religion, efforts that culminated in the massacre at Wounded Knee by the Seventh Cavalry on December 29, 1890. Within the year, James Mooney began research into what became the definitive work on the subject, The Ghost-Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890. Mooney's volume heavily influenced later works such as Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Warren (history, Univ. of California, Davis; Buffalo Bill's America) challenges Mooney's work by detailing how his reliance on sources such as federal documents and Native Americans who opposed the religion resulted in flawed conclusions. Warren convincingly argues that Mooney's erroneous picture was owing to those religious people who refused to cooperate with him, as they understandably did not want more violence exacted upon them. VERDICT This reinterpretation of the Ghost Dance religion is highly recommended for readers interested in Native Americans, anthropology, or the history of the West.—John R. Burch, Campbellsville Univ. Lib., KY --John R. Burch (Reviewed 03/01/2017) (Library Journal, vol 142, issue 04, p92)
  • An enlightening scholarly study of American Indian history that gets at the root tensions underlying the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee.Why were the Americans so concerned about the Ghost Dance religion practiced so enthusiastically by the Lakota Sioux and other Great Plains tribes in the 1880s? In this astute new appraisal, Warren (Western U.S. History/Univ. of California, Davis; Buffalo Bill's America: William Cody and the Wild West Show, 2005, etc.) finds in this religion—based on messianic visions by a northern Paiute in Nevada named Wovoka—a shred of hope for Indians denuded of their ancestral power and land, herded into reservations, and stripped of their ability to live by the hunting-and-gathering methods of their elders. The dance took elements of Christianity, such as the messiah figure, and wove them into a joyful communion involving movement and visions of horses and buffalo. Though the dancers could become frenzied and fall unconscious, Warren insists that it was essentially a peaceful dance, stressing harmony within this jagged new age of American industry, wage work, and deracination. However, many Americans—since Indians were not considered citizens until 1924, Warren does not include Indians as Americans here—felt threatened by the dances and banned the gatherings as being warlike, leading to the tragic misunderstanding between the military and hundreds of Lakota at the Pine Ridge Reservation in late 1890. Yet unlike the conclusions by authors and historians such as Dee Brown, author of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, Warren does not see the Ghost Dance as the death knell of Indian history or spirituality but rather the beginning of Indians' attempt to live and adapt to a strange new world in which literacy was necessary and industrial capitalism was the driving economic force. Warren also looks at the work of anthropologist James Mooney, who chronicled the passing of "authentic" Indian ways during this era by first studying the Ghost Dance. Though it may be too academic for some readers, this is an eye-opening work of American history.(Kirkus Reviews, February 15, 2017)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10175434
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Warren, Louis S
Dewey number
299.7/85244
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
E78.W5
LC item number
W35 2017
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Wovoka
  • Mooney, James
  • Ghost dance
  • Indians of North America
  • Indians of North America
  • Lakota Indians
  • Wounded Knee Massacre, S.D., 1890
  • Indians of North America
  • Indians of North America
  • Lakota Indians
  • Indigenous peoples
  • Indigenous peoples
  • Indigenous peoples
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
:the ghost dance religion and the making of modern America
Label
God's red son : the Ghost Dance religion and the making of modern America, Louis S. Warren
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 407-463) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
A hole in the dream -- Genesis. 1890: the messiah and the machine ; Great Basin apocalypse ; The birth of the prophet ; The Ghost Dance arrives ; Indian prophecy, American magic -- Dispersion. Seekers from a shattered land ; Plains passage ; Lakota ordeal ; Tin stars and holy power ; Spirit of the Ghost Dance ; Invasion and atrocity -- Persistence and renewal. The road from Wounded Knee ; Writing "The Ghost Dance religion and Sioux outbreak of 1890" -- The Ghost Dance as modern religion
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xiii, 480 pages
Isbn
9780465015023
Lccn
2016045328
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
  • 960043578
  • (OCoLC)960043578
Label
God's red son : the Ghost Dance religion and the making of modern America, Louis S. Warren
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 407-463) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
A hole in the dream -- Genesis. 1890: the messiah and the machine ; Great Basin apocalypse ; The birth of the prophet ; The Ghost Dance arrives ; Indian prophecy, American magic -- Dispersion. Seekers from a shattered land ; Plains passage ; Lakota ordeal ; Tin stars and holy power ; Spirit of the Ghost Dance ; Invasion and atrocity -- Persistence and renewal. The road from Wounded Knee ; Writing "The Ghost Dance religion and Sioux outbreak of 1890" -- The Ghost Dance as modern religion
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xiii, 480 pages
Isbn
9780465015023
Lccn
2016045328
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
  • 960043578
  • (OCoLC)960043578

Library Locations

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