Coverart for item
The Resource In the hurricane's eye : the genius of George Washington and the victory at Yorktown, Nathaniel Philbrick, (text large print)

In the hurricane's eye : the genius of George Washington and the victory at Yorktown, Nathaniel Philbrick, (text large print)

Label
In the hurricane's eye : the genius of George Washington and the victory at Yorktown
Title
In the hurricane's eye
Title remainder
the genius of George Washington and the victory at Yorktown
Statement of responsibility
Nathaniel Philbrick
Title variation
In the hurricanes eye
Title variation remainder
the genius of George Washington and the victory at Yorktown
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
In the fall of 1780, after five frustrating years of war, George Washington had come to realize that the only way to defeat the British Empire was with the help of the French navy. But as he had learned after two years of trying, coordinating his army's movements with those of a fleet of warships based thousands of miles away was next to impossible. And then, on September 5, 1781, the impossible happened. Recognized today as one of the most important naval engagements in the history of the world, the Battle of the Chesapeake--fought without a single American ship--made the subsequent victory of the Americans at Yorktown a virtual inevitability. In a narrative that moves from Washington's headquarters on the Hudson River, to the wooded hillside in North Carolina where Nathanael Greene fought Lord Cornwallis to a vicious draw, to Lafayette's brilliant series of maneuvers across Tidewater Virginia, Philbrick details the epic and suspenseful year through to its triumphant conclusion. A riveting and wide-ranging story, full of dramatic, unexpected turns, In the Hurricane's Eye reveals that the fate of the American Revolution depended, in the end, on Washington and the sea
Writing style
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Philbrick follows up his previous popular history illuminating lesser-known aspects of the Revolutionary War (Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution) with another insightful and accessible account of its by-no-means-inevitable success. Instead, he argues, drawing extensively on primary sources, the “bitter truth was that by the summer of 1781 the American Revolution had failed.” The Revolutionary Army was underfunded by the 13 states, whose posture of limited support was not challenged effectively by the Continental Congress. That contributed to thousands of “able-bodied citizens refusing to serve,” leaving the army understaffed and the fate of the colonies dependent on the French military. Philbrick’s narrative builds toward a dramatic recreation of what he deems “the most important naval engagement in the history of the world,” the Battle of the Chesapeake. In that undeservedly obscure encounter, French ships under the command of Adm. François de Grasse defeated a British fleet, which made Washington’s victory at Yorktown a “fait accompli.” Philbrick depicts Washington warts and all, including his responsibility for the rift with Alexander Hamilton and his slave ownership, highlighting the disconnect between the ideals of the revolution and its leaders’ enslavement of kidnapped Africans. This thought-provoking history will deepen readers’ understanding of how the U.S. achieved its independence. (Oct.) --Staff (Reviewed 08/20/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 34, p)
  • National Book Award winner Philbrick (Valiant Ambition) claims that historians have given insufficient attention to the pivotal September 1781 battle between the French and British Navies off the Chesapeake Bay during the American Revolutionary War. In Philbrick's estimation, while involving no Americans, it was the most decisive event leading to the defeat of British Army general Charles Cornwallis that October. After the fight, the French fleet backed up American and French ground troops strategically positioned around Cornwallis, who was entrenched at Yorktown with no chance of rescue by water. Philbrick credits the genius of George Washington's coordinated plan, which hinged on French naval support and control of the Chesapeake, for the Yorktown victory. He recounts the coincidental Caribbean hurricanes that sent the French fleet north, the Chesapeake Bay fight and naval maneuvering, last-minute financing, preliminary land battles, methodical placement of colonial and French forces for the clash with Cornwallis, as well as Washington's postvictory administrative headaches. Washington found it providential that all essential meteorological, military, and personality elements of his complex plan connected favorably at the right time. VERDICT Readers of Revolutionary War history will be enrapt by the blow-by-blow detail of this lively narrative, which is supported by countless letters and journal entries from key participants. [See Prepub Alert, 4/23/18.] --Margaret Kappanadze (Reviewed 10/01/2018) (Library Journal, vol 143, issue 16, p70)
  • In 1781, discouraged after five years of war, George Washington finally saw the tide turn. National Book Award winner Philbrick (Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution, 2016, etc.) reprises the protagonists of his last history of the War of Independence in a meticulously researched recounting of the events leading up to the colonists' victory at the Battle of Yorktown. Focusing on naval and military strategy, Philbrick—like Tom Shachtman in How the French Saved America (2017)—reveals the critical contributions made by the French navy, a fleet that had improved substantially since its defeat by Britain in the Seven Years' War. In France's Académie de Marine, students were taught "to think of a naval battle in terms of a chess game rather than a brawl," inciting, "for the first time in centuries, a whisper of doubt" in the "collective psyche of the British navy." Although British commanders were determined to win, they were faced with passionate French military men, such as the young Marquis de Lafayette, the Comte de Grasse, and the Comte de Rochambeau, as well as recalcitrant colonists. British successes emboldened, rather than intimidated, patriots. "Broken up into thirteen largely self-sufficient entities," the author asserts, "the United States was a segmented political organism that was almost impossible for the British army to kill." However, American soldiers were in a weakened state, starving and unpaid. Washington, who had recently learned of Benedict Arnold's betrayal, feared mutiny. But, Philbrick argues persuasively, Arnold's treason actually strengthened the patriots' resolve "by serving as a cautionary tale during one of the darkest periods of the war." The author portrays Washington as an aggressive, undaunted leader—even when facing distressing personal problems—who emitted a "charismatic force field." One British officer reported feeling "awestruck as if he was before something supernatural" in Washington's presence. Philbrick, a sailor himself, recounts the strategic maneuvering involved in the many naval encounters: ships' positions, wind direction and strength, and the "disorienting cloud of fire and smoke" that often imperiled the fleet. A tense, richly detailed narrative of the American Revolution. (Kirkus Reviews, September 1, 2018)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10732693
Cataloging source
TEFBT
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Philbrick, Nathaniel
Dewey number
973.3
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
  • E208
  • E241.Y6
LC item number
  • .P45 2018b
  • P55 2018b
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Washington, George
  • Washington, George
  • Yorktown (Va.)
  • United States
  • Southern States
  • United States
  • Chesapeake, Battle of the, Va., 1781
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the genius of George Washington and the victory at Yorktown
Label
In the hurricane's eye : the genius of George Washington and the victory at Yorktown, Nathaniel Philbrick, (text large print)
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First large print edition.
Extent
672 pages (large print)
Form of item
large print
Isbn
9781984827739
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
Specific material designation
large print
System control number
  • on1045430213
  • (OCoLC)1045430213
Label
In the hurricane's eye : the genius of George Washington and the victory at Yorktown, Nathaniel Philbrick, (text large print)
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First large print edition.
Extent
672 pages (large print)
Form of item
large print
Isbn
9781984827739
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
Specific material designation
large print
System control number
  • on1045430213
  • (OCoLC)1045430213

Library Locations

    • Williamsburg LibraryBorrow it
      515 Scotland Street, Williamsburg, VA, 23185, US
      37.377573 -76.770995
Processing Feedback ...