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The Resource Patriot battles : how the War of Independence was fought, Michael Stephenson

Patriot battles : how the War of Independence was fought, Michael Stephenson

Label
Patriot battles : how the War of Independence was fought
Title
Patriot battles
Title remainder
how the War of Independence was fought
Statement of responsibility
Michael Stephenson
Title variation
Patriot battles: how the War of Independence was fought
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Writing style
Review
  • A former editor of the Military Book Club, Stephenson (Battlegrounds ) aims to strip away "the slow accretion of national mythology and popular history" that has "embalmed" the American Revolution. The result is a well-documented, entertaining and mildly revisionist military history in two parts. In the first, Stephenson examines "The Nuts and Bolts of War," answering basic questions about who fought, how and why. He concludes, unsurprisingly, that "the war was not revolutionary in any military sense." What's intriguing is how similar the American and British armies were—Stephenson notes that for each, "It was like gazing into a mirror." To analyze prosaic details like supply and transport, weapons and medical care, the author uses an array of statistics and technical data—muzzle velocities, shot weights, equipment lists, etc.—but wisely leavens them with anecdotes. In part two, Stephenson turns to an analysis of the major battles of the war, from the opening skirmishes at Lexington and Concord to the climactic showdown at Yorktown, and concludes that the Continental Army's victory was always predicated on its numerical superiority. This excellent popular history should attract a wide audience with its fresh perspective. 16 maps. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed January 8, 2007) (Publishers Weekly, vol 254, issue 2, p40)
  • Stephenson (Battlegrounds ) seeks to reinvent the wheel. His objective is to explain who fought the battles of the American Revolution, how, and why—topics better explained long ago in superior texts. Part 1 covers "The Nuts and Bolts of War," with chapters analyzing such topics as who constituted the various military forces involved, the equipment they carried, and the food they ate. Parts 2 and 3 describe the battles occurring in the North and South, respectively. Battles are described well enough, but there is little explanation of events transpiring in between. The result is a series of case studies with little context. Throughout, Stephenson is prone to injecting absurd phrases and strange references. He refers to some British officers as "deadbeat young twits," compares a burned-out soldier to a computer's frazzled motherboard, and draws a parallel between the Revolution's financier Robert Morris and today's Halliburton. The absence of a conclusion is another problem. Does the author not have a point he wishes to reinforce? This is not a bad book; it is merely unnecessary. Readers would do better to select one of the more standard secondary sources Stephenson references, such as Robert Middlekauff's The Glorious Cause . An optional purchase for public libraries.—Matthew J. Wayman, Pennsylvania State Univ., Abington Coll. Lib. --Matthew J. Wayman (Reviewed February 15, 2007) (Library Journal, vol 132, issue 3, p134)
  • An iconoclastic, provocative study of the Revolutionary War that invalidates a few chestnuts—including the one that the surrendering British played "The World Turned Upside Down" at Yorktown."There is no hard evidence," writes former Military Book Club editor Stephenson (ed., Battlegrounds: Geography and Art of Warfare, 2003), that the British played anything other than a slow march, befitting the mournful occasion. There is plenty of evidence, though, that the war was a tough business for all concerned. Proceeding cautiously, Stephenson makes a case that will induce teeth-gnashing on the right-wing talk-show circuit, namely that, inasmuch as "colonial wars share a certain geometry," it is not beyond the pale to liken the rebel colonial struggle in America to nationalist insurgencies in places such as Vietnam and Iraq, where American soldiers now take the place of the imperialist lobsterbacks of old. (In case the point is lost, Stephenson notes that George Bush is more George III than George Washington.) Whatever the parallels, Stephenson observes that an army with a home-field advantage has vastly better odds of survival than one in a different country and culture; moreover, it is part of that geometry that militias will take it as a priority to crush loyalism, wherever it might be encountered. In the American colonies, this meant civil war on several fronts, though the loyalists were at their strongest in New York and New Jersey, one reason the British tried so hard to center the war there, where they could count on the help of friends. After examining such matters as the lives of officers, who had it easier than the enlisted men if only because they could resign without being hanged or beheaded as deserters, and the musket-and-mutton material world of the soldiery, Stephenson turns to more familiar ground, analyzing the war's most important battles and sometimes, as with Trenton, musing about why things didn't work out disastrously for the American cause.Contrarian and well-written—a welcome remedy to Parson Weems–ish tales of the past. (Kirkus Reviews, February 15, 2007)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
165602
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1946-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Stephenson, Michael
Dewey number
973.3/3
Illustrations
plans
Index
index present
LC call number
E230
LC item number
.S75 2007
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • Battles
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
how the Revolutionary War was fought
Label
Patriot battles : how the War of Independence was fought, Michael Stephenson
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [385]-395) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxv, 421 pages
Isbn
9780060732615
Isbn Type
(acid-free paper)
Lccn
2006041317
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
plans
System control number
  • 70267199
  • (OCoLC)70267199
Label
Patriot battles : how the War of Independence was fought, Michael Stephenson
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [385]-395) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxv, 421 pages
Isbn
9780060732615
Isbn Type
(acid-free paper)
Lccn
2006041317
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
plans
System control number
  • 70267199
  • (OCoLC)70267199

Library Locations

    • James City County LibraryBorrow it
      7770 Croaker Road, Williamsburg, VA, 23188, US
      37.377573 -76.770995
    • Williamsburg LibraryBorrow it
      515 Scotland Street, Williamsburg, VA, 23185, US
      37.377573 -76.770995
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