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The Resource Patriot pirates : the privateer war for freedom and fortune in the American Revolution, Robert H. Patton

Patriot pirates : the privateer war for freedom and fortune in the American Revolution, Robert H. Patton

Label
Patriot pirates : the privateer war for freedom and fortune in the American Revolution
Title
Patriot pirates
Title remainder
the privateer war for freedom and fortune in the American Revolution
Statement of responsibility
Robert H. Patton
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Review
  • Patton (The Pattons: A Personal History of an American Family ) turns his attention to an often overlooked aspect of the Revolutionary War: maritime privateering, or legalized piracy. Patton is careful to distinguish the mixed motives of these “patriot pirates,” for often there was less patriotism than simple greed. Nevertheless, their work fulfilled George Washington's strategic aim to win the war by exhausting Britain into giving up the struggle. In what Patton terms “a massive seaborne insurgency” that dwarfed the efforts of the colonists' small navy, thousands of privateers nettled British shipping, sometimes gaining vast fortunes. Privateering also turned into a handy political issue when Benjamin Franklin, the American representative in France, succeeded in persuading his hosts to allow Yankee skippers to sell their booty in French ports—a breach of the country's neutrality that aggravated diplomatic tensions, as Franklin knew it would, and helped cement Paris's commitment to American independence. Patton gives an absorbing exhumation of an undersung subject that will be of particular interest to Revolution buffs. (May 20) --Staff (Reviewed March 24, 2008) (Publishers Weekly, vol 255, issue 12, p64)
  • An illuminating look at an underappreciated chapter of the Revolutionary War: the daring, faintly disreputable, privateer war on British maritime interests.As Robert Morris, financier to the American Revolution, remarked of the British, "They have much more property to lose than we have." Accordingly, and following wartime conventions of the era, the Continental Congress commissioned citizen sailors to attack British shipping. For their towering self-interest and for the drain they took on scarce resources necessary to the Continental Navy, John Paul Jones detested them. For carrying the war to the British, Washington, Franklin and John Adams, from a polite remove, cheered them on. For the staggering potential profit, the nation's leading financiers, Philadelphia's Morris, the notorious Browns of Providence and an entirely new generation of entrepreneurs and speculators rushed to fund them. Patton (Life Between Wars, 1997, etc.) tells marvelous sea stories about privateers Jeremiah O'Brien, John Manley, James Mugford, Gustavus Conyngham and about the Royal Navy, charged with the impossible task of patrolling a 1,000 miles of coastline with only 50 warships to protect against the depredations of these "legal" pirates. Though the privateers had much to gain, if captured they were denied all rights typically accorded prisoners of war and held under the terms of Parliament's controversial "Pirate Act of 1777," untried and without the possibility of exchange in wretched prison ships. Patton also subtly examines the curious interplay between patriotic purpose and economic gain, and the always uneasy marriage between public service and private speculation. Through his sensitive treatment of Morris and the Browns—and especially of Silas Deane, the colonies' agent in France—and of Nathanael Greene, Washington's favorite general, the author demonstrates how, from the beginning, rampant capitalism compromised the virtue of the infant republic and how privateering specifically accustomed the country to a variety of enduring, sometimes dubious, financial practices.A pleasing mixture of high-seas adventure and shrewd analysis. (Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2008)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
259983
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1957-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Patton, Robert H.
Dewey number
973.3/5
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
E271
LC item number
.P27 2008
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • Privateering
  • Franklin, Benjamin
  • United States
  • France
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the privateer war for freedom and fortune in the American Revolution
Label
Patriot pirates : the privateer war for freedom and fortune in the American Revolution, Robert H. Patton
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [245]-278) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxii, 291 pages
Isbn
9780375422843
Lccn
2007033612
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • 2007033612
  • (OCoLC)165957643
Label
Patriot pirates : the privateer war for freedom and fortune in the American Revolution, Robert H. Patton
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [245]-278) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxii, 291 pages
Isbn
9780375422843
Lccn
2007033612
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • 2007033612
  • (OCoLC)165957643

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