Coverart for item
The Resource So you don't get lost in the neighborhood : a novel, Patrick Modiano ; translated from the French by Euan Cameron

So you don't get lost in the neighborhood : a novel, Patrick Modiano ; translated from the French by Euan Cameron

Label
So you don't get lost in the neighborhood : a novel
Title
So you don't get lost in the neighborhood
Title remainder
a novel
Statement of responsibility
Patrick Modiano ; translated from the French by Euan Cameron
Title variation
So you do not get lost in the neighborhood
Creator
Contributor
Author
Translator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Summary
"[A] single, unexpected phone call to a man living quietly in Paris launches a chain of menacing encounters and events, unlocking a dark secret he had erased from memory" --
Member of
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • The first sentence in the latest novel by Nobel laureate Modiano to appear in translation is a fragment, “Almost nothing.” This neatly illustrates his procedures and themes. Modiano’s world is episodic, uncertain, and incomplete, a tissue of inference built up through old-fashioned means of detection: conducting interviews, reviewing dossiers, reading old phone books, and looking for old buildings. The protagonist is Jean Daragane, an aging, isolated novelist. He receives a phone call from a stranger who has found his old address book in a railroad station café. Daragane abruptly abandons new technologies, as if nothing of significance can take place except face-to-face. Soon nothing and no one are quite what they seem, leading Daragane to investigate his own past. “They had mattered so little in his life . . . Walk-on parts, long since dead.” Modiano’s achievement is to preserve the dignity of those people with “walk-on parts” in our lives, who meant nothing to us, yet whose presence, and influence, can’t be discounted if we are to give a sincere account of our lives and ourselves. -- Autrey, Michael (Reviewed 09-01-2015) (Booklist, vol 112, number 1, p44)
  • A quietly haunting search for the truth—or at least for the facts—of a postwar French childhood, Nobel-winner Modiano’s novel spins out over a summer in which “everything is uncertain.” The quest begins with a phone call: elderly, isolated writer Jean Daragane has lost his address book on a train, and a man named Gilles Ottolini has found it. Ottolini offers to return the book, but when the two meet in a Paris cafe, he demands information about one of the people listed: Guy Torstel, whose name also appears in one of Jean’s early novels, Le Noir de l’ é t é (The Black of Summer). Although he cannot immediately remember Torstel and is reluctant to engage with the outside world (“in his solitude, he had never felt so light-hearted”), Jean nevertheless finds himself reading through a dossier about a 1951 murder case, given to him by Gilles’s girlfriend, Chantal Grippay, and encountering in these papers names that were once familiar to him, including Torstel. Modiano’s text rewards the patient reader—as this time-hopping account of coincidences, uncertainties, and echoes of a half-forgotten history unfolds, “the present and the past merge together,” building toward a powerful, memorable conclusion. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed July 6, 2015) (Publishers Weekly, vol 262, issue 27, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Published in France in 2014, this novel is billed as suspense, though it's suspense of a very different order from that of your standard cloak-and-daggers thriller. Jean Daragane, a novelist who prizes his solitude, receives a call from a stranger who says he has found Daragane's address book. When he goes to retrieve it, Daragane starts worrying that the shady Gilles Ottolini means to blackmail him (even Ottolini's companion, Chantal, warns him later that Ottolini is dangerous). But what Ottolini really wants is information about Guy Torstel, whose name is in the address book. At first, Daragane doesn't recall Torstel, but the name—and a dossier given him by Chantal—slowly awakens memories of a house where he stayed as a child in Saint-Leu-la-Fôret and the young woman named Annie who cared for him. Daragane still aches for Annie, yet it's also clear that she's associated with some sort of crime in his young life, a crime Modiano reveals in the end not with a bang but in his typically delicate and elliptical way. VERDICT More fleshed out than Modiano's mid-career novels yet retaining their not-quite-touchable qualities, this won't work for anyone who wants robust emotion but is brilliantly structured and effectively captures the unflashy unease of real life.[See Prepub Alert, 3/30/2015.]— BH --Barbara Hoffert (Reviewed September 1, 2015) (Library Journal, vol 140, issue 14, p94)
  • Claustrophobic, moody, none-more-noir novel by French Nobel Prize winner Modiano (Suspended Sentences, 2014, etc.).Phone calls don't happen often in Jean Daragne's world. He's sealed himself off in a Paris apartment, shutters drawn always, but especially now during an unusually strong heat wave that "emphasized his loneliness." Still, he goes out from time to time, losing his address book on one small excursion away from his study. Therein lies the rub, for now his phone is ringing, and on the other end is a voice insistently offering to return his contacts to him. But why does the caller want to know about a character who, we learn in painstakingly deliberate time, figures in a novel that Daragne wrote years earlier and had forgotten about? Indeed, Daragne has forgotten a great deal that Gilles Ottolini, small-time crook and erstwhile jockey, would like to remind him of, not least a murder that took place more than half a century earlier. Modiano writes tantalizingly, offering just a part of a detail here and another there, inviting the reader to participate in Daragne's bewilderment (Why him? Why now?), the unfolding identities of the players (Is Ottolini a blackmailer? Is Chantal a femme fatale or a pawn? Just what is the relationship between Annie Astrand and the perhaps half-American Roger Vincent?), and the hallucinatory stroll into a past that constantly raises as many questions as it answers. Modiano blends elements of the procedural, the ghost story, and the existentialist novels of his youth to unpeel an extremely juicy onion at whose core, in the end, would seem to be a meditation on the nature of memory and storytelling alike: "Perhaps he had gathered together all these disparate elements in the hope that Daragne would react to one of them…." Lyrical and portentous—and sometimes even "dreary and threatening," as Daragne describes the voice at the other end of the line. Vintage Modiano, and a pleasure for fans of neonoir fiction.(Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 2015)
Assigning source
provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10443713
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1945-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Modiano, Patrick
Dewey number
843/.914
Index
no index present
LC call number
PQ2673.O3
LC item number
P6813 2015
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Cameron, Euan
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Social isolation
  • Memory
  • Consequences
  • Life change events
  • Senior men
  • Authors
  • Telephone calls
  • Books
  • Cold cases (Criminal investigation)
  • Paris, France
Target audience
adult
Label
So you don't get lost in the neighborhood : a novel, Patrick Modiano ; translated from the French by Euan Cameron
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"First published in France as Pour que tu ne te perdes pas dans le quartier by Editions Gallimard, Paris, 2014" -- Verso title page
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
155 pages
Isbn
9780544635067
Lccn
2015017303
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • 900180050
  • (OCoLC)900180050
Label
So you don't get lost in the neighborhood : a novel, Patrick Modiano ; translated from the French by Euan Cameron
Publication
Note
"First published in France as Pour que tu ne te perdes pas dans le quartier by Editions Gallimard, Paris, 2014" -- Verso title page
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
155 pages
Isbn
9780544635067
Lccn
2015017303
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • 900180050
  • (OCoLC)900180050

Library Locations

    • Williamsburg LibraryBorrow it
      515 Scotland Street, Williamsburg, VA, 23185, US
      37.377573 -76.770995
Processing Feedback ...