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The Resource The Oregon Trail : an American saga, David Dary

The Oregon Trail : an American saga, David Dary

Label
The Oregon Trail : an American saga
Title
The Oregon Trail
Title remainder
an American saga
Statement of responsibility
David Dary
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Writing style
Award
  • Booklist Editors' Choice, 2004.
  • Western Heritage Award for Outstanding Nonfiction Book, 2005.
Review
  • This is another lively work from one of our best chroniclers of the Old West. Dary (Cowboy Culture ; The Santa Fe Trail ; etc.) looks at the men and women who trekked the trouble-strewn paths to the nation's northwest coast. It's an epic American story of limitless hopes, searing losses, pioneers, missionaries and not a few bad characters. Dary opens with 18th-century maritime explorers and carries us into the late 19th century, when the trail west from Independence, Mo., had ceded its importance to the railroads. In the shadow of such great earlier historians as Francis Parkman and Bernard De Voto, Dary is matter-of-fact and exhaustive. Unfortunately, the facts are sometimes overwhelming, and a reader yearns for some analysis. But Dary makes up for this lack by salting his account with quotations from travelers' diaries and illustrations. He follows the rutted way of keeping the Indian tribes subsidiary to the story. Yet his closing chapter on the Oregon Trail's rebirth as a tourist draw in the 20th century is a real contribution to modern western lore. It's hard to imagine a more informative introduction to the westering itch along the Oregon Trail and to those who responded to it. 86 b&w illus., 7 maps. Agent, Spectrum Literary. Alternate selection of the History Book Club and the Crossings Book Club. (Nov. 10) --Staff (Reviewed October 25, 2004) (Publishers Weekly, vol 251, issue 43, p39)
  • The Oregon Trail was the major overland migration route between the Mississippi River and the western North American coast until the completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869. Pioneer families with covered wagons traveling west in search of their dreams became an iconic image of frontier American culture. Western historian Dary, now retired from teaching journalism at the University of Oklahoma, provides a balanced and exciting account of the trail's history from its origins in the fur trade era to the mass pioneer emigrations of the 1840s–60s. Splendid uses of personal overland migration stories illustrate this historic and geographic overview, with appendixes of place names and modern roads making for a reader-friendly experience. Dary's inclusive history complements Laton McCartney's Across the Great Divide , which focuses on the trail's origins in 1812–13, and the reprint of Overton Johnson and William H. Winter's 1846 account, Route Across the Rocky Mountains . Highly recommended for public and academic libraries.—Nathan E. Bender, Buffalo Bill Historical Ctr., Cody, WY --Nathan E. Bender (Reviewed November 1, 2004) (Library Journal, vol 129, issue 18, p101)
  • Dary follows the Oregon Trail, pre-history to post-history, with many nooks and crannies in between.From the early 1840s until the coming of the transcontinental railroad in 1869, the Oregon Trail was one of the great routes west, running for 2,000 miles (at an oxen-powered 3-miles-per-hour) from Missouri to the country that was to become Washington, Oregon, and California. Award-winning western historian Dary (The Santa Fe Trail, 2000, etc.), a brisk, silvery writer, makes careful use of diaries, journals, recollections, reports, and newspaper accounts to conduct readers from the first European peopling of the Oregon area (for this he's prepared to go back to Marco Polo) to beaver hunters and missionaries, from the Hudson's Bay Company to the expeditions searching for an overland route. The author explains the economic pressures that encouraged citizens to undertake so arduous a journey, recounting many of the westward movement's historic events: the Donner Party, the Gold Rush(es), the Mormon exodus, treaties and promises brokered with native populations, treaties and promises broken. But it is Dary's depiction of the great and awful everyday that will grab the reader: cholera and the buffalo gnat ("a diminutive insect," wrote one emigrant, "that, before you are conscious of its presence, has bitten your face ears, and neck in ten thousand places"), a French naval deserter running a trading post to hell and gone in the Nebraska panhandle, the unadorned wonder of life on the trail. "I could not but reflect upon the singular concurrence of the events of the day," mused another traveler. "A death and a funeral, a wedding and a birth had occurred in this wilderness, within a diameter of two miles, and within two hours' time."A thoroughgoing chronicle, told with generous enthusiasm, skill, and an eye for plain truths as well as detail. (86 illustrations, 7 maps) (Kirkus Reviews, September 15, 2004)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
156047
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Dary, David
Dewey number
978/.02
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
F597
LC item number
.D37 2004
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Oregon National Historic Trail
  • Frontier and pioneer life
  • West (U.S.)
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
an American saga
Label
The Oregon Trail : an American saga, David Dary
Instantiates
Publication
Distribution
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 361-391) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
The exploration of Oregon -- Astoria -- Discovering the Oregon Trail -- John McLoughlin and the missionaries -- The American occupation of Oregon -- The emigrants of 1843 -- Self-rule and more emigrants -- Fifty-four Forty or fight -- The year of decision -- New Zion, more emigrants, and a massacre -- A lull before the rush -- The Gold Rush of 1849 -- The hectic year of 1850 -- The changing road -- More change and civil war -- Decline of the Trail -- Rebirth of the Trail -- Appendix A: Historic landmarks -- Appendix B: Cutoffs and other roads
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xiv, 414 pages
Isbn
9780375413995
Lccn
2004046512
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
54685532
Label
The Oregon Trail : an American saga, David Dary
Publication
Distribution
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 361-391) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
The exploration of Oregon -- Astoria -- Discovering the Oregon Trail -- John McLoughlin and the missionaries -- The American occupation of Oregon -- The emigrants of 1843 -- Self-rule and more emigrants -- Fifty-four Forty or fight -- The year of decision -- New Zion, more emigrants, and a massacre -- A lull before the rush -- The Gold Rush of 1849 -- The hectic year of 1850 -- The changing road -- More change and civil war -- Decline of the Trail -- Rebirth of the Trail -- Appendix A: Historic landmarks -- Appendix B: Cutoffs and other roads
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xiv, 414 pages
Isbn
9780375413995
Lccn
2004046512
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
54685532

Library Locations

    • Williamsburg LibraryBorrow it
      515 Scotland Street, Williamsburg, VA, 23185, US
      37.377573 -76.770995
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