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The Resource We own the sky : a novel, Luke Allnutt, (text large print)

We own the sky : a novel, Luke Allnutt, (text large print)

Label
We own the sky : a novel
Title
We own the sky
Title remainder
a novel
Statement of responsibility
Luke Allnutt
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
When a devastating illness befalls his family, Rob Coates's world begins to unravel. Suddenly finding himself alone, Rob seeks solace in photographing the skyscrapers and clifftops he and his son Jack used to visit. He embarks on a journey to find his way back to life, and forgiveness
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Rob and Anna meet when they are students at Cambridge, and despite differences in their backgrounds and temperaments, they get married. They are devastated when their son, Jack, conceived after two miscarriages, is diagnosed with a brain tumor at age five. Rob does what almost anyone facing a medical crisis does these days—he becomes obsessed with looking for information online and soon discovers a discussion forum, Hope’s Place, for parents of children with brain tumors. A seemingly successful surgery is just a reprieve, and the prospect of losing Jack puts the differences between Rob and Anna into sharp relief. Tensions come to a head when Rob takes Jack to Prague to seek a radical treatment from a doctor he learned about on Hope’s Place. British first-novelist Allnutt plunges the reader into narrator Rob’s experience of searing loss and the attendant denial, fear, anger, guilt, blame, and grief. The book’s title refers to Rob’s photography website, where he tries to stay connected to his son by posting panoramas and coded messages about places they visited together. Heartrending. -- Quinn, Mary Ellen (Reviewed 3/1/2018) (Booklist, vol 114, number 13, p24)
  • /* Starred Review */ This impressive debut from Allnutt doggedly recounts a young family’s tragedy. Between programmer Rob Coates’s relentless optimism, his auditor wife Anna’s knack for order, and their son Jack’s joyful demeanor, their life in London is happy and full of love. But when a tumor is found in Jack’s brain, the bonds of the marriage are tested. After Jack is given a year to live, Rob becomes intrigued by an experimental treatment he learns about from an online forum. Though Anna isn’t interested in pursuing it, Rob goes behind her back while she is away and takes Jack to the clinic in Prague. But the questionable treatments administered to Jack only worsen his health. As his marriage crumbles, Rob becomes determined to atone for his mistake by making sure no one else is hurt by the bogus clinic. Rob’s experience as a father of a child stricken with cancer is punishing, marked by a desperate belief that a cure is just around the corner, frustration with well-meant and poorly delivered sympathy, and renewed appreciation for the smallest comfort and kindness. The resulting story is tender and raw, spun in pragmatic prose as personal as a friend’s heartfelt admissions, with turns as unexpected as life itself. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed 02/05/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 6, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ DEBUT When a child is gravely ill, the realization of what he or she might never experience—first date, high school graduation, first child—is put into stark relief in this emotional novel of love, loss, and hope. Rob and Anna Coates and their son Jack are a happy family until their lives are divided by a single day—"before" cancer diagnosis and "after." Rob and Anna, facing the devastating possibility that Jack might die, are crippled by their anticipation of the worst. Each parent copes differently. Anna is stoic but blames herself and believes that without Jack, there would be nowhere for her love to go. Rob drowns his worry but finally trades his vodka bottle for a camera, creating photographic essays of Jack's favorite places, giving visual voice to grief and fear. In the end, Rob and Anna learn that with love, there is always hope for the future. Allnut, who began this book after he was diagnosed with colon cancer, teaches us to cherish the simple things in life and that sometimes the only way to keep going is to share your story. VERDICT Readers who enjoy highly emotional journeys will appreciate this vivid and heart-twisting debut. [See Prepub Alert, 10/18/17.] --K.L. Romo (Reviewed 01/01/2018) (Library Journal, vol 143, issue 1, p79)
  • A couple is torn apart by a child's cancer in Allnutt's debut. From the first chapters, readers know that something has gone seriously awry in the marriage of young upper-middle-class Brits Rob and Anna. Addled by vodka, Rob wakes up to discover that Anna and their young son, Jack, are gone. There follows an extended flashback detailing how this came about. The couple met while attending Cambridge, she in economics and he in computer science. Degreed, they soon settle down to a comfortable London life: She's an accountant; he has a lucrative contract with a startup. After two miscarriages, Anna and Rob are overjoyed at the birth of a son. As Jack grows, he bonds with stay-at-home dad Rob, whose career dilemmas, interposed at this point, do little to either advance the story or illuminate his character. Similarly, beyond the stereotypical attributes of her trade, we never learn much about Anna. At age 5, Jack is diagnosed with a brain tumor. Two specialists are consulted and surgery performed, affording provisional hope: A celebratory vacation in Crete ensues. But Jack has a relapse, and this time only palliative measures are possible. Rob consults Hope's Place, a social media forum, obsessively following "Nev," one poster whose son Josh had a similar malignancy. Josh is now in complete remission thanks to the ministrations of a Dr. Sladkovsky in Prague. Sladkovsky's clinic, though pricey, has purportedly worked miracles with "immuno-engineering." Suspecting snake oil and concerned about finances, Anna balks at this expedient. (The costs, if any, of Jack's U.K. treatment are never addressed, which U.S. readers might find disappointing.) When a family emergency calls Anna away, Rob, desperate that time is running out, spirits Jack to Prague. Sladkovsky's experimental protocols seem to be working—then an irate Anna arrives. In its depiction of ordinary people in dire circumstances, the book opts for uplifting messages over controversy. Sympathy for Allnutt's characters is de rigueur; unfortunately, they lack the depth to command it. Undeniably well-meaning but too circumspect in its approach. (Kirkus Reviews, February 15, 2018)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10638443
Cataloging source
FMG
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Allnutt, Luke
Dewey number
823/.92
Index
no index present
LC call number
PR6101.L458
LC item number
W42 2018
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Photographers
  • Sons
  • London (England)
  • Life change events
  • Loss (Psychology)
  • Grief
Target audience
adult
Label
We own the sky : a novel, Luke Allnutt, (text large print)
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
527 pages (large print)
Form of item
large print
Isbn
9781432852757
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Specific material designation
large print
System control number
  • on1039095165
  • (OCoLC)1039095165
Label
We own the sky : a novel, Luke Allnutt, (text large print)
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
527 pages (large print)
Form of item
large print
Isbn
9781432852757
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Specific material designation
large print
System control number
  • on1039095165
  • (OCoLC)1039095165

Library Locations

    • James City County LibraryBorrow it
      7770 Croaker Road, Williamsburg, VA, 23188, US
      37.377573 -76.770995
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