Coverart for item
The Resource Welcome to the world, Baby Girl!, Fannie Flagg

Welcome to the world, Baby Girl!, Fannie Flagg

Label
Welcome to the world, Baby Girl!
Title
Welcome to the world, Baby Girl!
Statement of responsibility
Fannie Flagg
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Set during the late '70s, Fannie Flagg's novel follows the career of Dena Nordstrom, a tall, blonde, corn-fed girl who makes it big in Manhattan when, as a top TV anchorwoman, she makes ungodly amounts of money and to everyone in the industry and outside she has it made. However, Dena is beset by private devils of her own and finally consults a psychiatrist, who helps her face her traumatic feelings about her mysterious, emotionally distant mother and her nomadic childhood. Finally unlocking the secret of her racial heritage, Dena decides to give up her life in New York for the slower pace and friendly atmosphere of her hometown of Elmwood Springs, Missouri
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
New York Times Notable Book, 1998
Review
  • Author of the best-selling Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe (1987) and cowriter of the script for the popular movie based on that book, Flagg follows up with this sentimental look at small-town life. Set during the late '70s, the novel follows the career of Dena Nordstrom, a hard-charging TV anchorwoman determined to make her mark in prime-time television, although she has qualms about its change in focus from hard news to scandalmongering. Despite her aura of confidence, however, Dena is having a tough time. Plagued by a drinking problem and a bleeding ulcer, Dena finally consults a psychiatrist, who helps her face her traumatic feelings about her mysterious, emotionally distant mother and her nomadic childhood. Finally unlocking the secret of her racial heritage, Dena decides to chuck New York for the slower pace and friendly atmosphere of her hometown of Elmwood Springs, Missouri. Framing Dena's story are excerpts from an old-timey radio show broadcast in the '40s and portraits of Dena's eccentric, lovable relatives. With its colloquial style, focus on family problems, and small-town setting, this novel, though somewhat contrived, won't disappoint fans of Fried Green Tomatoes and should also appeal to those who liked Olive Ann Burns' Cold Sassy Tree (1984). ((Reviewed August 1998)) -- Joanne Wilkinson
  • Because so much of Flagg's third novel takes place in the 1970s media-celebrity echelons of New York City, it doesn't offer the regional and historical color and texture of its predecessor, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe. Instead, Flagg's achievement here lies in a well-choreographed story of loyalty and survival that zigzags deftly across the post-war years, panning in on the never-changing decency of Elmwood Springs, Mo., then pulling back to watch national TV news devolve into sensationalism--all the while drawing us into the compelling life of Dena Nordstrom. Star of America's most popular morning news show, Dena shuts herself down and shuts men out for painful reasons that are unknown even to her. Only after the stress of ambush- and sound-byte journalism brings on a hemorrhaging ulcer does Dena slowly unearth the scandal that, when Dena was four, drove her mother from Elmwood Springs, hometown of the war hero father that Dena never knew. That her mother's nemesis is a newspaper gossipmonger is nicely ironic, although her mother's secret shame seems slightly larger than life. In contrast, Dena's college friend Sookie and great aunt Elner are reminders of how well Flagg can cook up memorable women from the most down-to-earth ingredients, while a cameo by Tennessee Williams is uncannily true to life. Fans may be sorry at first to leave Elmwood Springs for the big city, but even the most reluctant will get wrapped up in Dena's search for the truth about her family and her past. Author tour; Random House audio. (Oct.)
  • How to follow up a sensation like Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe? With this story of rising TV star Dena Nordstrom, who thinks she's too busy for anything but her career.
  • The author of Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafƒ (1987, etc.) returns with another engaging paean to the joys of down-home southern life. Gorgeous, ambitious Dena Nordstrom is doing very well in 1970s Manhattan. She's the popular star of a network morning show, poised to rise as the ratings-driven TV industry promotes appealing women to make palatable the increasingly nasty interviews that are turning the news into scandalmongering "entertainment." Dena barely remembers Elmwood Springs, Missouri, where she spent four happy years before her mysterious mother abruptly left town and embarked on a decade of wandering before vanishing from 15-year-old Dena's life altogether in 1959. But the folks back in Elmwood Springs remember Baby Girl, daughter of a local boy killed in WWII, and Flagg has some obvious but effective fun with the contrast between the townspeople's homey-to-the-verge-of-caricature existence and Dena's high-powered urban-professional lifestyle. Of course, she's not really happy: she drinks too much and has bleeding ulcers that send her, acting reluctantly on doctor's orders, to a handsome psychiatrist (who falls in love with her at first sight, natch) and then back to Elmwood Springs to recuperate from overwork. Readers may share Dena's initial reaction to the relentlessly folksy locals ("Get me out of here," she commands her agent), but the New York cast of characters is just as cliched: noble, Walter Cronkite-like anchorman; sleazy network executive; sleazier "researcher"/dirt-digger. The author does, however, know how to spin a rattling good yarn. Even those who gag at the way she holds up "Neighbor Dorothy" and her hokey 1940s radio show as the epitome of small-town goodness will probably find themselves flipping pages rapidly to discover what happened to Dena's mother. The denouement has a clever twist, and if the happy ending is not exactly a surprise, it taps into enough classic American fantasies about getting out of the rat race to be quite moving. Shamelessly corny--and extremely enjoyable. (Kirkus Reviews, September 1, 1998)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
027366
Cataloging source
BAY
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Flagg, Fannie
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Women television personalities
Target audience
adult
Label
Welcome to the world, Baby Girl!, Fannie Flagg
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxvi, 467 pages
Isbn
9780449005781
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Note
Imprint varies.
System control number
  • 39898397
  • 436517
Label
Welcome to the world, Baby Girl!, Fannie Flagg
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxvi, 467 pages
Isbn
9780449005781
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Note
Imprint varies.
System control number
  • 39898397
  • 436517

Library Locations

    • James City County LibraryBorrow it
      7770 Croaker Road, Williamsburg, VA, 23188, US
      37.377573 -76.770995
    • Williamsburg LibraryBorrow it
      515 Scotland Street, Williamsburg, VA, 23185, US
      37.377573 -76.770995
Processing Feedback ...