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The Resource Whirlwind : the American Revolution and the war that won it, John Ferling

Whirlwind : the American Revolution and the war that won it, John Ferling

Label
Whirlwind : the American Revolution and the war that won it
Title
Whirlwind
Title remainder
the American Revolution and the war that won it
Statement of responsibility
John Ferling
Title variation
American Revolution and the war that won it
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Written in the authoritative and narrative-driven style that has made his books critical and commercial successes, John Ferling's Whirlwind will become the definitive history of the American Revolution for our time. This master historian illuminates the years 1763 to 1783--from the end of the French and Indian War that left England triumphant in North America to the signing of the Treaty of Paris and the final departure of British troops from New York City. Embracing characters both celebrated and unknown, Ferling chronicles the myriad and complex events and contentious viewpoints that drove Americans in their insurgency against Great Britain and sustained them in the seemingly quixotic belief that they could win their independence. He takes us to the halls of power in Parliament and the streets of London to view the Revolution from British perspectives. He presents the individual battles--from Lexington and Concord to Yorktown---in a fresh and dramatic new light. With a wide scope and insight, John Ferling brings the most important event in America's long history to a new generation of American readers.--From publisher description
Pace
Writing style
Review
  • Ferling (Jefferson and Hamilton) enhances an impressive list of publications on the American Revolution with a fast-paced survey that echoes Carl Beard and 1930s historiography in its assertion that the revolution’s roots were economic. However, Ferling is not a single-issue determinist, paying ample attention to the argument that American colonists believed revolt “could usher in a better world.” For the sake of that world, they fought an all-out war, one they almost lost and in which “about one in sixteen free American males of military age died.” Furling handles the conflict’s ups and downs with a professorial ease, complemented by mastery of a broad spectrum of primary and secondary sources. He smoothly and clearly covers the battles from Bunker Hill to Yorktown, and presents the development of an ideology of revolution that engaged increasing numbers of the “politically impotent.” Given the improvised nature of the rebels’ war effort, Ferling suggests that rather than the Americans winning, the British lost through strategic overextension and ineffective command. He also excels at detailing the hammering out of governmental institutions from a kaleidoscope of provincial assemblies, town meetings, and church pulpits. The result was a “new-model experimental polity” that remains a work in progress. (May) --Staff (Reviewed March 23, 2015) (Publishers Weekly, vol 262, issue 12, p)
  • The latest work from presidential biographer Ferling (emeritus, history, Univ. of West Georgia; Jefferson and Hamilton; John Adams ) argues that the American Revolution (1765–83), or rather the specific timing of it, was caused largely by economic factors. Ferling further states that severing ties with Great Britain allowed colonists greater control over their own destinies, and freed them to create the ideal society they desired. Beginning with the later stages of the French and Indian War, the author explains the thought patterns leading up to the idea of separation from the mother country. Throughout the work, one gets a sense of growing momentum as the conflict takes shape. The author makes a distinction between the struggle's military side and the actual revolution, meaning governmental and societal change. The result is an objective history that emphasizes the political and military events of the era. VERDICT Ferling has created another accessible yet scholarly work on the American Revolution. While its primary appeal is to history buffs, academics looking for an introductory survey history should also find this work useful.— Matthew Wayman, Pennsylvania State Univ. Lib., Schuylkill Haven --Matthew Wayman (Reviewed March 15, 2015) (Library Journal, vol 140, issue 5, p120)
  • /* Starred Review */ From servants to citizens: a nuanced study of the American Revolution focused on how the war changed the way Americans saw themselves.Having written abundantly about the Revolutionary War, accomplished scholar Ferling (Emeritus, History/Univ. of West Georgia; Jefferson and Hamilton: The Rivalry that Forged a Nation, 2013, etc.) employs his extensive knowledge to relay a tremendously complicated and multilayered story of the gradual embracing of ideas of independence by the once-loyal colonists. Economic incentives drove the colonists to question the relationship with the mother country. They were offended by having to pay for Britain's chronic warfare, furnish soldiers and then endure England's "coldhearted indifference" to matters of the colonists' "vital interests." Attempts by Britain to enforce imperial trade laws—by the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763, one-third of England's trade was with the colonists—only led to more alarm that Britain was scheming to take away liberties. Little by little, the colonists began to react, and Ferling takes note of certain important early firebrands, e.g.—Virginia's Patrick Henry, Boston's Samuel Adams, John Dickinson and his "Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania." Others, such as Benjamin Franklin, emissary to London, played both sides until they were sure which way the wind was blowing. Ferling effectively shows how the colonists' sense of themselves changed from the very bottom up. From deep in the provincial hamlets, they were organizing, training their militias and accepting more egalitarian proclivities and self-governing practices, such as freedom from the Anglican yoke. Hostilities against Britain provoked a "rooted hatred" for the mother country and a "growing sense of identity as Americans," although the outcome was in no way certain. In fact, for many years, it looked quite bleak. Ferling impressively demonstrates how the military reality eventually galvanized the fledgling country. A first-rate historian's masterful touch conveys the profound changes to colonists' "hearts and minds."(Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2015)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10416288
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Ferling, John E
Dewey number
973.3
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • plates
Index
index present
LC call number
E208
LC item number
.F43 2015
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • United States
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the American Revolution and the war that won it
Label
Whirlwind : the American Revolution and the war that won it, John Ferling
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
"I am a Briton": on the brink -- "Loyal but jealous of their liberties": changes in imperial policy and the colonists' thinking, 1759-1766 -- "A plan for governing and quieting them": the second great crisis, 1767-1770 -- "I am unwilling to give up that duty on America": to the Tea Party, 1770-1773 -- "Behold America where matters are driving": 1774, year of momentous decisions -- "Blows must decide whether they are to be subject to this country": the war begins -- "Great Britain is equal to the contest": war brings crucial changes in 1775 -- "The birthday of a new world": America declares independence -- "The American cause is in a critical situation": the New York Campaign in 1776 -- "Across America in a hop, step, and a jump": the campaigns of 1777 -- "The central stone in the geometrical arch": the war is transformed in 1778 -- "The longest purse will win the war": reform at home while the war takes a new turn -- "Whom can we trust now?": a year of disasters, 1780 -- "A war of desolation shocking to humanity": the southern theater in 1780-1781 -- "We have got Cornwallis in a pudding bag": the decisive victory at Yorktown -- "Oh god, it is all over": peace, conspiracy, demobilization, change, 1781-1783
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
xxii, 409 pages, 16 pages of unnumbered plates
Isbn
9781620401729
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2014033315
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color), maps
System control number
  • 902985942
  • (OCoLC)902985942
Label
Whirlwind : the American Revolution and the war that won it, John Ferling
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
"I am a Briton": on the brink -- "Loyal but jealous of their liberties": changes in imperial policy and the colonists' thinking, 1759-1766 -- "A plan for governing and quieting them": the second great crisis, 1767-1770 -- "I am unwilling to give up that duty on America": to the Tea Party, 1770-1773 -- "Behold America where matters are driving": 1774, year of momentous decisions -- "Blows must decide whether they are to be subject to this country": the war begins -- "Great Britain is equal to the contest": war brings crucial changes in 1775 -- "The birthday of a new world": America declares independence -- "The American cause is in a critical situation": the New York Campaign in 1776 -- "Across America in a hop, step, and a jump": the campaigns of 1777 -- "The central stone in the geometrical arch": the war is transformed in 1778 -- "The longest purse will win the war": reform at home while the war takes a new turn -- "Whom can we trust now?": a year of disasters, 1780 -- "A war of desolation shocking to humanity": the southern theater in 1780-1781 -- "We have got Cornwallis in a pudding bag": the decisive victory at Yorktown -- "Oh god, it is all over": peace, conspiracy, demobilization, change, 1781-1783
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
xxii, 409 pages, 16 pages of unnumbered plates
Isbn
9781620401729
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2014033315
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color), maps
System control number
  • 902985942
  • (OCoLC)902985942

Library Locations

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      37.377573 -76.770995
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